Learn Guitar Beginners Theory

Learn Guitar Beginners Theory

Learn Guitar Beginners Theory

Learn Guitar Beginners Theory

Learn Guitar Beginners Theory – Minor and Major 2nd Intervals

As you are learning guitar theory on the guitar you will eventually come across a theory concept known as Major and Minor 2nd Intervals. Major and Min 2nds are great for helping to understand scale theory and advanced chord extensions such as 9th and 13th chords.

Let’s take a closer look at the Intervals known as Minor 2nds and Major 2nds

The simplest explanation of Intervals are when you take two notes and play them either together or separately. In the case of Major or Min 2nds you are specifically taking what is called the root note and playing one note a half step or whole step above the root note either together or separately.

The Minor 2nd Interval: Learn Guitar Beginners Theory Learn Guitar Beginners TheoryLearn Guitar Beginners Theory Learn Guitar Beginners Theory Learn Guitar Beginners Theory 

The best way to hear a min 2nd interval is to think of สล็อตเว็บตรงไม่ผ่านเอเย่นต์ the Jaws movie sound track. Remember the sound that would have been made if the diver drops into the lava lake and completely melting down into the ground. That is the minor second interval.

The construction of the minor second interval:

The minor second interval is built from the major second and a half step. Let’s look at that interval as written in musical notation:

*(F-A)—-3——————————————————————

becomes

*(F-A)—-2——2———————————

If you are familiar with the movie Jaws, you will recognize the minor second interval.

The construction of the major second interval:

The major second interval is built from the minor second and a whole step. Let’s look at the construction of the major second interval:

*(C2)—-3—–3———————————

*(C2)—-0—-0———————————

*(C1)—-0—-1———————————

*(C0)—-0—-2———————————

The best way to memorize the sound of this interval is to associate each interval with the word “lava” which may remind you of the sound of olden land.

The Major 2nd Interval:

The best way to learn the sound of this interval is to think of the waves on a beach when the wind is blowing directly into the beach. The strong ocean waves resound outward making a small rippling sound on a medium size beach. You can recognize that the wind is creating large, crashing waves.

The construction of the Major 2nd Interval:

The major 2nd interval is built from the major second and a half step. Note that the construction of this interval is slightly different than the one we looked at for the minor 2nd interval.

If we look at this interval as we would construction of a minor 2nd interval, so A-B and C-D, we will see that the only difference we can hear is that here we have two whole steps between the major second and the minor second.

A Minor 2nd Interval:

When we raise the major second an half step we get A-B. Once we hear that we have an interval with the same name as the first one we would intuitively know that we had just moved two whole steps up.

A Major 2nd Interval:

Now that we know that A-B is a relative minor 2nd we can work out other similar new intervals.

Remember, the major second is defined by the 6th note and the minor second by the 5th note.

Minor 2nd and Major 2nd Intervals:

The relative minor 2nd interval has a special form that makes it seem like a major second interval when it is really a 2nd interval. This also works for the major 2nd interval.

The relative major 2nd interval has a half step between the 6th and 7th note. When we do this interval in a major key then the resulting interval is a major 2nd.

Here is an example in the key of “D” major

D major scale – D – E – F# – G – A – B – C# – D

D major second interval: D-E-F#

D major second interval: D-F#-G

And one more example in the key of “G” major

G major scale – G – A – B – C# – D – E# – F# – G

[D] – [E] – [F#] – [G] – [A] – [B] – [C#] – [D]

As you can see, we can create some very mystery and awesome sounding chords by using the 2nd and 4th notes from the major scale to connect all the thirds and semitones up or down the keyboard.

Learn Guitar Beginners Theory